21st Century Internment Camps: Identity and Security in Xinjiang

Public Lecture: 21st Century Internment Camps: Identity and Security in Xinjiang with Dr David Tobin

Monday 13th May 1830-2030

The Pearce Institute, 840-860 Govan Rd, Glasgow G51 3UU (near Govan underground station)

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/90987386@N05/ [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)] Uyghurs performing Mashrap Kashgar

One of the most concerning international issues- and one of the least-known- is the mass surveillance, disappearances and extra-judicial detention of the Uyghur population in China. Join us at this public lecture by David Tobin to find out more.

China’s “Great Revival” tells a story of the Chinese people uniting and rising to reverse ‘national humiliation’ by the West and return to their pre-modern, rightful place at the centre of world affairs. However, since outbreaks of ethnically targeted violence in Tibet and Xinjiang (2008-2009), the party-state has described the creation of a shared national identity based on Han culture and ‘ethnic unity’ as a “zero-sum political struggle of life or death” and a prerequisite to China’s rise. Towards dreams of unity and revival, China has operated mass extra-judicial internment camps since 2017 as “Education and Transformation Centres” in Xinjiang, interning approximately 10% of the adult Uyghur population.

This talk analyses the social and political dynamics behind China’s ethnic minority policy shift towards “fusion” that has culminated in both mass extra-judicial internment camps and the “One-Belt-One-Road” foreign policy initiative. The talk draws from ethnographic fieldwork during the riots of 2009 and the latest official documents from the 19th Party Congress and Xinjiang Working Group meetings. It argues that the party-state exacerbates cycles of insecurity in the region by targeting Uyghur identity as a threat to China’s existence and provoking Uyghur resistance to official policy.

About Dr David Tobin: Hallsworth Research Fellow in the Political Economy of China at the University of Manchester. He is currently researching how postcolonial relations between China and the West shape foreign policymaking and ethnic politics in contemporary China. His forthcoming book with Cambridge University Press, Securing China’s Northwestern Frontier: Identity and Insecurity in Xinjiang, analyses the relationship between identity and security in Chinese policy-making and ethnic relations between Han and Uyghurs in Xinjiang.

Category: Events, News · Tags:

Comments are closed.

About

The Centre for Human Ecology is an independent academic institute, network, registered cooperative, and registered charity based in Glasgow, Scotland, with an international membership of graduates and fellows. It exists to stimulate and support fundamental change towards ecological and social justice through education, action and research, drawing on a holistic, multidisciplinary understanding of environmental and social systems.

Contact

email: info@che.ac.uk
Twitter
Facebook