Liminal community projects for sustainability: where do we go from here?

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Liminal community projects for sustainability: where do we go from here? With Svenja Meyerricks
13th April 2016 1800-2000

CHE Library, 2nd Floor, The Pearce Institute, 840-860 Govan Rd, Glasgow G51 3UU (near Govan underground station)

Booking essential: free, or gift what you can. All funds to to our speaker and to support our charitable work.
Book here: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2537847

CHE roundtable discussion with Svenja Meyerricks on ‘Liminal community projects for sustainability: where do we go from here?’

What roles do community projects for sustainability and low-carbon living play in the wider political landscape, in Scotland and globally? Svenja explores how through the lens of ritual theory, community projects open up liminal spaces of learning and social transformation on a small scale, and create communitas or social bonding. However, these liminal spaces remain relatively marginal as long as the final stage is missing – an integration of the learned sustainable practices into wider low-carbon infrastructures, and social practices within ecological limits.

This Centre for Human Ecology roundtable discussion begins with a short talk discussing case studies of community projects which Svenja undertook as part of a PhD thesis (available here). Svenja focused in particular on how community projects have been part of the climate change narrative in Scotland through the Scottish Government’s Climate Challenge Fund, and on narratives which have emerged through community action in practice.
The talk will be followed by an in-depth discussion – we invite in particular community practitioners, activists and scholars to explore together barriers, potentials and tools to deepen practices within community projects.

About Svenja:

Dr Svenja Meyerricks received her PhD from the University of St Andrews in 2015 for her thesis titled ‘Community projects as liminal spaces for climate action and sustainability practices in Scotland’. She also holds an MSc in Human Ecology (University of Strathclyde 2008) and an MA in Social Anthropology/ Philosophy (University of Glasgow 2007).
She currently works in Milton Community Garden and Food Hub for North Glasgow Community Food Initiative, and is a Director of the Centre for Human Ecology.

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