Fellows

Fellows

  Vérène Nicolas

Vérène was the course coordinator of the MSc from 2005 to 2010. She also co-developed the Community Programme, working with marginalised communities across Scotland and enabling community activists to acquire skills in critical thinking, local community action and participative democracy.
Her current practice focuses on teaching skills and practices to live life with more integrity and facilitate change at individual, community and organisational levels. She is particularly interested in transformative approaches including grief & healing work, nonviolent communication, dialogue, Biodanza, and the Freirian-based “Training for Transformation”.
She lives with her husband, Alastair McIntosh, in Govan, Glasgow.

 

  Crispin Hayes

Crispin is an independent eco-consultant who  contributed for a decade to the core of the former MSc course, and co-developed the Food Culture & Agri-Culture option module. His interests are carbon, food, localisation, and community & environment.
Crispin now focusses on his consultancy business CW Hayes Associates that works in these areas of interest.  See www.eco-consultancy.co.uk

 

  Eurig Scandrett
Eurig  uses popular education for social change, as a sociology lecturer and in collaboration with environmental justice movements. He is also involved in pro-feminist men’s activities, and is a member of the Iona  and Ashram communities. He is a board member of the Bhopal Medical Appeal, Zero Tolerance Trust and Active Inquiry forum theatre company.
Eurig: “I would describe myself as a radical Christian and a Socialist. Human ecology gives meaning to my work because it highlights the creative tension involved in integrating different ways of engaging with the world: analysis and action; science and spirituality; ecology and creativity; matter and meaning.  I seem to be able to combine Marxism, ecology, Christianity and feminism and still be a human ecologist. Since my association with CHE began, I have played a role in developing Friends of


Eurig: “I would describe myself as a radical Christian and a Socialist. Human ecology gives meaning to my work because it highlights the creative tension involved in integrating different ways of engaging with the world: analysis and action; science and spirituality; ecology and creativity; matter and meaning.  I seem to be able to combine Marxism, ecology, Christianity and feminism and still be a human ecologist. Since my association with CHE began, I have played a role in developing Friends ofBhopal Survivors Speak: Emergent Voices from a People’s Movement, and am currently involved in a campaign against environmental injustices perpetrated by the Jewish National Fund in Israel / Palestine.”

 

  Jennifer Batty
Part of the former MSc team, Jennifer’s ecological research has focussed on impacts of chemical pollutants on wildlife. Her current interests are in Ecoliteracy and developing workshops and course materials to enhance understanding of our impacts on, and engagement with, nature.
Jennifer has extensive environmental education experience, including university lecturing, course development, individual study programmes and external NGO student project development.  She has been associated with the Human Ecology MSc since 2001, firstly as course coordinator for 2 years, and then as an organiser of the Sustaining Ecosystems option module, as well as part of the core teaching team.

 

  Osbert Lancaster
Osbert is an independent changemaking consultant and facilitator, helping people, organisations & planet flourish. He worked at CHE from 1997 to 2008, latterly as executive director. http://changemaking.co.uk/

 

  Tessa Ranford

A Royal Literary Fund Fellow at Queen Margaret University, Tessa taught the option module ‘Creativity in Life and Art’ from 2001-2005. She is a writer, poet, and cultural activist, and also works with Scottish PEN, campaigning for freedom from oppression for writers worldwide.
Tessa writes: Since retiring from the Scottish Poetry Library, I have been concerned with promoting pamphlets as a vehicle for poets (see www.scottish-pamphlet-poetry.com for further details).
I feel in tune with human ecology because I consider myself a ‘pattern head’ rather than a blockhead. Accordingly, I am interested in politics, culture, the environment, education, children and life.
‘Shades of green’, my latest poetry pamphlet (Autumn 2005), grew out of my experience in the community of the Centre for Human Ecology.
Tessa’s website: www.wisdomfield.com
More information on PEN in Scotland: www.scottishpen.org

 

 David Key

A graduate in 2003, Dave was a Director from 2004-05 and co-led the Ecopsychology module from 2004 until 2010. For over 15 years Dave has been designing and leading outdoor experiential programmes that encourage people to live sustainably through direct experiences of wild nature. For an example of his work see the Natural Change Project, which he designed and co-facilitated for WWF. Dave lives near the beach in Cornwall with his partner and 6 year old daughter.

 

  Samantha Graham

Originally from Sydney, Australia, Samantha was part of the first MSc cohort, graduating in 1993. After living in Scotland for 8 years, she returned to Sydney to run a sustainability & cultural transformation consultancy, working with businesses, NGOs, and local government. Samantha writes: The Masters gave me what I now see is a fairly unique worldview, one of the few that is sufficiently systemic and inclusive so as to inform sustainability initiatives, corporate and civic, in meaningful, consciousness-changing ways.
Human Ecology provides the backdrop, concepts and language for all the programmes I design, whether they’re corporate sustainability, undergraduate or postgraduate university courses, or contributions to my local government’s sustainability initiatives.
To contact Samantha: samantha@stormlight.com.au